October 10, 2018

Saab A26 Submarine Specifications Compared with the Soryu's (especially AIP)

Picture of a Kockums Naval Solutions designed 4V-275R Mk III Stirling engine, licenced by Kockums to KHI. Four are on the Japanese Soryu Mark 1s (with air independent propulsion (AIP) and lead-acid batteries (LABs)) (Photo via https://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/dark_99_jp/39533734.html).
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The main value of the following table may be the specifications provided by Anonymous, in early October 2018, for the not yet launched Swedish Saab A26 submarine. The first A26 may be launched in 2020. Two are being built for the Swedish Navy and Saab wishes to sell more to Poland and the Netherlands. 

Submarine Type
A26 (not yet launched)
Soryu Mark 1s (AIP and LABs) 
 (launched 2004)
Length
66.1m long [6]
84m [8]
Beam
6.75m beam [6]
9.1m [8]
Displacement
1925 tonnes surfaced [3] [6]  
2,900 tonnes (surfaced) [8]
4,200 tonnes (submerged)
Crew
17 to 35 [6]
65  [8]
Weapons
533mm and 400mm torpedoes, mines [4] Also AUVs and ROVs [6]
533mm Type 89 torpedos, Harpoon missiles, mines [8]
Multimission Portal
>6m long [4]
>1.5m diameter [4]
no
Diesel engines
3 x 8PA4V200SM12
2× Kawasaki 1225/25SB  [8]



Stirling AIP Type of Engine
2? x new Stirling with low signature [1]
4 x V4... or 4V-275R MkIII
continual output (electrical)
 not yet known
rated electrical output (continual) 4 x 60kW = 240kW [2]
continual output (mechanical)
  not yet known
rated mechanical output (continual) is 1.25 x 60kW = 75kW.
4 x 75kW = 300kW mechanical output
120% output (2min) (electrical)
  not yet known
rated electrical output at 120% output (2min) is 4 x 72kw = 288kW [2]
120% output (2min) (mechanical)

1.25 x 72kW = 90kW
4 x 90kW = 360kW



Electrical Motor
1 x Jeumont Electric permanent magnet motor [5]
Kawasaki? SMC-8
Pressure hull steel
Strenx® 700 [7]


[1] The A26 will be fitted with new generation Stirling engines, on floating decks and more heavily insulated to have a much smaller acoustic footprint and more power than the previous V4-275R series used in Sweden’s Gotlands and Japan’s Soryus.
[2] Set by Japanese Standard for Ministry of Defense (NDS)
[3] a changeable figure - growing with increasing roles (and perhaps with an eye to the large sized submarine the Dutch want) - best measured in metric tonnes
[4] “Designing For Future Submarine Capability” by Gunnar Öhlund, SVP Marketing, R&D and Business Development Kockums AB http://www.sms1835.no/arkiv/2012-08-29%20Sea%20Power%20Seminar%20Kockums.pdf  page 7
[5] 1 x permanent magnet (PM) motor made by Jeumont Electric [here and here]
The information on cost components for the Saab A26s would depend on many technical and business negotiation parameters of course. Some parameters can be quantified but many of them might not be quantified and would remain confidential.
[6] Sweden’s Defense Materiel Administration FMV https://www.fmv.se/sv/Projekt/Ubat-typ-A26/A26-del-for-del/
[7] Pressure hull materials of A26 Strenx® 700 See Table on Submarine Matters may be same as “Weldox 700”. Both equivalent to US standard HY-100 (aka HY100). As Strenx® 700 is commercially available it is cheaper than military submarine use only pressure hull steels.

Next week estimated pricing data will be published, comparing A26s with Soryus and TKMS Type 212CDs.

Anonymous and Pete

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Pete,

if you have missed it Saab has put up a video on YouTube were you can see the progress of the A26 and even the mid-life upgrade of the first Gotland class sub with the added plug visible and it was put in the sea in June.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKDAg121oUA

/Kjell

Anonymous said...

Hi Pete

On Soryu MK 1s:

Calculation standard of dry displacement for Japanese submarine is different from that European standard. Dry displacement of Soryu MK1s in the European standard is presumably 3,600tonnes.

Electric motor is not made by Kawasaki.

The pressure hull materials are NS80 and NS110. Based on hull welding research by MOD, possible combination of the materials is NS80 hull/NS110 stiffener and NS110 hull/NS110 stiffener. The former combination is for pressure hull with small diameter (propulsion, diesel, a part of AIP and torpedo sections) and with large diameter (other sections), I think.

Regards

Pete said...

Thanks Kjell

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKDAg121oUA is most informative and in English.

Regards

Pete

Pete said...

Thanks Anonymous

I assume dry displacement of Soryu MK1s means their surfaced displament?

Regards

Pete

Anonymous said...

Hi Pete

Standard displacement (dry displacement) of JMSDF ship is specified by Ship Design Standard Bylaw of JMSDF (unpublished). But, judging from the related JMSDF document, dry displacement is presumably weight of ship itself. Surface displacement (loaded displacement) of European submarine seems to be full loaded displacement [1, 2], the sum of deadweight tonnage (DWT: the total weight of cargo, fuel, fresh water, ballast water, food, passengers, passengers, etc) and dry displacement.

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Displacement_(ship)
[2] https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%8E%92%E6%B0%B4%E9%87%8F

Regards

Pete said...

Hi Anonymous

Thankyou for your explanation at 11/10/18 5:54 PM Displacement is certainly a complex matter.

Thankyou also for your comments on pressure hull steel for Soryus of 11/10/18 6:53 AM
That shows that steels used can be of more than the one yield strength normally assumed. So your description of two strengths, NS80 and NS110, in the Soryu, is useful.

Regards

Pete

Anonymous said...

Hi Pete

High cost of LIBs is caused by huge capital investiment cost. There is possibility of export of LIBs [1].

For spread of LIBs in submarine sector, effort toward cost reduction of capital investiment including establishment of joint venture is needed. Currenty, many manufacturers try to develop LIBs for submarine which provide dispersion of capital investiment and affect adversely on cost reduction of LIBs.


[1] FY2012 Review of Administrative Approach by Japan Ministry of Defence,17/JUN/ 2016

MoD: We are considering introduction of submarine with LIBs. But, capital investment cost is huge which will raise much the unit price of submarine. We understand superior performance of LIB-submarine. But, it is too expensive and we currently hesitate introduction of LIB-submarine. (page 18)

MoD: We do not import batteries for submarine, because performance of submarine is somewhat estimated from specification of battery. Convensionally, we could not export the batteries for submarine. But, as “the Three Principles of Transfer of Defense Equipment and Technology” was set, possibility of export will be discussed when the export projects of batteries occurs. (page 24)

Regards

Anonymous said...

Hi Pete

New data on pice of LIBs for 27SS, 28SS and 29SS. Total price of 672LIB modules fluctuates every year, but average price is US$78million (average, [1]) for 672 LIB modules except first year cost [2] of US$ 9.8million.

LIB is 4.5 times more expensive than LAB, we had to better consider that price ratio of commercially available LIB/LAB is four and that LIBs for 27SS, 28SS and 29SS are Lithium Nickel Cobalt Aluminum Oxide.

GS Yuasa constracted new manufacturing plant of LIBs for JMSDF submarine in 2016, until having a return on investment for this plant, GS Yuasa does not manufacture new battery for submarine.

[1] Price fluctuates every year for LIB and LAB, maybe, because of price fluctuation of raw materials.
[2] Cost (jigs, measurint equipment, etc) needed in start of production (=first year).

Regards